Ohio Operation TRIAD Aims to Reduce Rate of Traffic Violations

The Ohio State Highway Patrol has an aggressive driving prevention program known as Operation TRIAD (Targeting Reckless, Intimidating, and Aggressive Drivers). Law enforcement runs its TRIAD events in specifically targeted areas. These events are not held on a regular basis, but instead take place at various times throughout the year whenever it is determined that they are necessary.

Operation TRIAD is generally conducted in and around metropolitan areas, such as Columbus, and was put into place to make some of the more dangerous and car accident prone areas of Ohio safer. Highway Patrol publicizes this program through the media, in order to make drivers in the area more aware of TRIAD’s existence, with the goal of promoting a safer driving environment for all motorists.

The main feature of this program is the use of fixed-wing aircrafts. These planes monitor traffic from a safe distance, and observe speeders and other aggressive drivers. The pilots then communicate with officers on the ground, and notify them of traffic offenders. Each police district is responsible for researching and implementing Operation TRIAD in their area. However, the Ohio State Highway Patrol will provide the aviation services to city and county law enforcement agencies to help them address their local traffic issues.

The program is usually used in areas that law enforcement agencies receive a high amount of complaints in. It is also used in high traffic areas, high DUI areas, school bus routes, and railroad crossings. Aviation pilots assisting law enforcement have been instructed to focus on the following driving behaviors:

  • Speeding beyond the flow of traffic
  • Using the shoulder of the road to pass other drivers
  • Lane change violations
  • Railroad crossing violations
  • Following too closely
  • Improperly merging into traffic
  • Failure to yield at ramps or intersections

Common citations individuals receive during Operation TRIAD include:

  • Speeding
  • Running a red light
  • Not signaling
  • Driving in car pool lane
  • Not stopping for school bus
  • Not stopping for pedestrians
  • Not using seat belt
  • Driving on shoulder
  • Passing in a no passing zone
  • Drunk driving
  • Reckless driving

Even with the effective use of this program, police must still have probable cause in order to pull you over. If you feel you have been unfairly targeted, or have had your rights violated, a traffic attorney in Columbus can analyze your case and ensure that your rights are protected.

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